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Potassium Metabisulfite

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Potassium Metabisulfite

SKU: 8359x

Potassium Metabisulfite is a widely used winemaking agent. It effectively kills wild yeast and bacteria.
$2.79

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$2.79
Description

Details

Potassium Metabisulfite is a widely used winemaking agent. It effectively kills wild yeast and bacteria. The condition of your grapes and pH levels may vary the amount needed. This agent helps to clear the way for your yeast, better allowing it to do its job. Sulfites also aid in inhibiting enzymatic browning in white wines, and improves the flavor when used correctly. Metabisulfite does lose potency over time, so you should replace your supply at least annually. If you have some old metabisulfite, it can be used for sanitizing purposes.

Dosage:
  • 1/4 teaspoon per 5 gallons, which yields 50 ppm.
Details & Instructions

Additional Information

Gravity Level Medium

Reviews
5.0 / 5.0
11 Reviews
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De-chlorinate your water
You can remove Chloramine with this for home brewing, as well as use it for your wine making. Easier to measure, if you have a very precise scale.
December 18, 2012
Does Its Job
The potassium metabisulfite was used in my winemaking to help kill wild bacteria/yeast so that the wine wouldn't go over the fermentation level wanted. I am sure to replace my supply once a year as I have noticed that over time it seems to really clump up and have read it becomes less effective.
March 11, 2013
Great sanitizer
As other reviewers mentioned, this works as a great sanitizer. A gallon can be mixed up and stored up to 6 months. Most books I've read also suggest adding some with each wine racking. The potassium version is preferred over the sodium version as well. The cost difference is not significant at all.
June 25, 2013
Must have for aging
Used this for aging my wine kit from Midwest. The instructions say to use if you intend to store your wine for extended periods of time (most reds). Purchased the 1 lb bag because it is much cheaper per gram then the smaller bottle.
July 23, 2013
Killed it
Did it's job and completely stopped fermentation. Couldn't ask for more!
October 14, 2013
Metabisulfite
I follow the instructions on how much to use and everything turns out great
December 5, 2016
Purchased
over 2 years ago
easy to use
like the powder better than tablets, just measure and add
October 27, 2012
Sanitation is key
Absolutely necessary to protect your wine from the horrors of bacteria and oxidation. A little goes a long way for sure, so it can be hard measuring out the right amount for smaller batches.
January 5, 2013
Great for long storage of wines
If you're making wine and want to age the wine for long periods (like over a year) then adding a little extra of this is advisable. Wine kits come with some in them, but the instructions say to add a little extra if you plan on storing for a long time.
January 16, 2013
Great addition
This is a must. Me and my wife love wine, but 30 bottles from one kit is a lot, and we would like to ensure it lasts.
February 15, 2013
Customer Q&A
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Browse 2 questions Browse 2 questions and 6 answers
I have overdosed my juice by ten times. will it be ok by waiting a week for the sulfite ti dissapate?
A shopper on Sep 24, 2017
BEST ANSWER: It will take more than a week. If, by "juice", you mean finished wine, you might be okay by bulk aging for a year. You might also consider aerating it periodically to gas off, but you have to be careful not to overdo it, lest you oxygenate the must.
If you mean actual "juice" that has yet to be fermented, I really don't know. You can try pitching yeast into a quart of sugar-water (plus nutrients), then add 1/4 cup of your sulphited must into that after a few hours. The next day, try another 1/4 cup. Gradually add the juice over a period of time and only a little at a time, and see how it goes. I've done this before with success, but not with that much sulphite.
The picture shows 1/4 tsp per 6 gallons, in the description it says per 5 gallons.... Which one is it?
A shopper on Feb 4, 2017
BEST ANSWER: It's both (or rather, in between). If someone wanted to get very precise, they should be dosing by the gram. But for the home hobbyist, it is sufficient to estimate to the amount of 1/4 tsp being sufficient sulphites to treat 5-6 gallons. I have only used 6-gallon batches (and 1-gallon), and the dose of 1/4-tsp has worked for me in dozens of batches. (For 1-gallon batches, I eyeball a third of a 1/8 teaspoon to get close to 1/20th of a tsp suphites. This has worked for me every single time.)

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