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Raspberry Puree - Vintner's Harvest

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Raspberry Puree - Vintner's Harvest

SKU: 6261

$19.99
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Description

Details

This 49 oz. can of Oregon fruit puree is prepared from raspberries grown in Oregon's fertile Willamette Valley. Commercially sterilized and containing no preservatives, you can add this puree directly to your primary or secondary fermenter to flavor beer, mead, or wines. As the puree contains no seeds, add 10-15% less puree as you would fruit. One 49 oz. can will make 1 gallon of fruit wine. You should never boil the puree as it can create off flavors.

Fruit Information:

  • Color: Medium to dark red
  • Brix: 7-13
  • pH: 2.9-3.8
Details & Instructions

Additional Information

Origin -

Reviews
4.7 / 5.0
11 Reviews
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Brewed my own Lindemans Framboise
I added two cans of this puree to 5 gallons of a Lambic I had maturing for 18 months. It gave a very nice taste that worked well with the sourness and taste from the Brett strains. I also added 2 grams of S-04 so it would be consumed in a short time, and then I bottled. The S-04 then carbonated the priming sugar.
March 19, 2013
Great in a Raspberry Wheat Beer
I added a can of this to my Raspberry wheat bear, along with 2 ounces of Raspberry extract, and it came out great. This has a subtle taste and the extract helped make it bolder, and together they didn't smell or taste artificial.
March 30, 2013
Great Flavor
This can was the perfect size to add straight into the secondary. The flavor was perfect, not too sweet or sour. Great addition to wheat beer.
April 2, 2013
Great in a Mead Melomel
I used this in a Mead to add some raspberry flavor to the honey and add some acidity. Very nice complement, the flavors blended very well. You can not only taste the raspberry, you can smell it. Great stuff.
June 3, 2013
Mead Flavoring
Used a can in Primary, and a can in secondary making a batch of mead. The result has been very pleasant. People have really enjoyed the flavor.
December 2, 2015
Good for Lambics
I brewed a Lambic, and let it age 2 years._x000D_I took a can of this puree , opened it, but left the top on, froze it (to rupture the cell walls), then thawed it and added it to the Lambic along with some fresh yeast._x000D_I bottled it 6 weeks later, and gave it 2 months to carbonate. It was really nice and smooth. This puree is better than fresh fruit because the yeast can get to all of it, not just the outside.
August 17, 2013
Goes great in a Wheat beer
This summer I added a can to a wheat beer. I gave it an extra two weeks to ferment and settle. It added a delicious raspberry flavor and aroma to the beer that was subtle and natural. This is much better than any extract I've used.
September 19, 2013
Good flavor
This puree sinks to the bottom of the carboy and I heard bubbling for a month so I gave it 6 weeks in the secondary before bottling. It also creates a thick mushy mass at the bottom so be careful not to rack that else it will be in your beer. This mass settles to the bottom, but it tends to be bitter. One can gives some raspberry taste, but it's mild, it's much less noticeable than using the small containers of extract.
January 15, 2014
Buy the Vintners raspberry extract
I bought the Red Raspberry ale and I decided to buy the Vintners raspberry extract since I learned from the Apple Ale. I tossed out the raspberry extract and used this in the secondary and I am now waiting to see how it will come out.
June 29, 2013
Okay Fruit Flavor
First off. I think this product is pretty expensive. I know they say that these purees are the equivalent of 1.5 to 2 times the amount of flavor that a 1 pound of fresh fruit provides, but I'm not sure if that's right. At $19.99 and with shipping, it comes out to about $7-8 a pound for the the puree, when you can buy frozen raspberries usually for $2-3 a pound at the supermarket. Maybe less during sales._x000D__x000D_What you are paying for is ease of use. Frozen fruit isn't pastuerized like this is and it doesn't have the seeds strained out. Moreover, the puree is shelf stable so you don't need valuable freezer space to store this. For some people that is enough benefit._x000D__x000D_As for the product itself. I found that the flash cooking method imparts the fruit with a hint of oxydation and a slight cooked flavor. More like raspberry jam than fresh off the cane fruit. This is fine in some beers like stouts or porters that you want to add fruit to, but in a pale wheat where the fruit is a main feature, it leaves a weird tangy aftertaste IMO. _x000D__x000D_Also, beware that this fruit is very acidic. Even though beer is already acidic, this drops the beer much lower. This affects the beer in a couple ways._x000D_1. You might have a lot more protein precipitate out due to the low pH, so age the beer a little bit long on fruit than you normally would to make sure it's clear, or rack more than once._x000D_2. Yeast tend to not like very low pH, so add this puree after primary is completely done and probably in secondary so you don't kill the yeast and add autolysis flavors. Consider adding fresh yeast if you are bottling._x000D_3. The beer will taste especially sour and if there is not enough residual sweetness from fermentation, it will be unbalanced. If sending out for competition, inexperienced judges might mistake the light body and fruit acidity for contamination
July 15, 2013
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